Home > innovation, Media Economics, Technology > What will the Television watching experience be like in 5 years?

What will the Television watching experience be like in 5 years?

I posted an answer on Quora.com recently in response to the following question:

Q. What will the Television watching experience be like in 5 years?
I sit on my couch with my phone in my hand and remote in the other, but still watch tv in the same way I did 15 years ago. With smart TV’s and users on the couch having smart phones, I imagine there is a lot of disruption and changes that will take place in this market.

A. “The passive lean-back experience at the heart of television watching has resisted many attempts to change it. It will remain at the core of watching and will not be replaced by viewers selecting the next video file every five minutes in the next five years. Even as digital video rises in advanced markets, television viewing is rising alongside it. The most evident support for this is that web players like Youtube and Yahoo are changing themselves to organize content into “channels” (sounds familiar?).

These days five years is too far out in tech terms to predict! However, there are trends that are influencing the mainstream television watching.

1) TV will continue to extend to multiple platforms: Tablets, consoles, web and mobile. This will make TV a more personal and portable experience since it will increase individual viewing rather than family-unit viewing. In Western markets this is already the norm, but in developing markets this will be a stronger influence.

2) Rise of the second screen and social communities: Consumers continue to multi-task while watching TV, but increasingly they will be looking at additional info to support their TV viewing. This will build communities around content in a new way that extends beyond broadcaster borders. TV has always been social and the subject of conversation. However, technology now means that the scale and reach of the conversation changes (from a few friends/colleagues to global discussions) and the speed of the discussion accelerates (from next-day to immediate).

3) Time-shifted viewing will dominate and begin to influence the broadcaster scheduling model and advertising formats. DVRs/ Network playback/ catch-up viewing online will encourage advertisers to focus on integration of brands within content rather than relying only on spots (but those will still be there in five years time).

4) New younger talent: New talent (actors/ writers) will reach the TV screen through discovery on the web (e.g. Youtube etc). Barriers to entry into the TV business for individuals will be lower. Some programs will be “hits” at a TV scale before they reach the TV screen.

The barriers to massive change in television watching are not technological but commercial and social. The technologies to change our tv viewing experience are already available but the entrenched advertising and subscription business models in markets like the US will continue to be a large hurdle against revolutionary change. On the social level, viewers still want to have a predominantly passive viewing experience rather than on-demand viewing. This may change as younger generations grow up without the habit of watching broadcast channels but five years is too soon for it to become mainstream.

TV watching will drastically change when someone figures out the perfect recommendation engine to line up programs selected from sources all over the web and at the same time untangles the complicated rights and window-release systems currently in place to free-up content while still able to finance its creation. But that’s a separate discussion altogether!

In summary, the TV watching experience will be more social, more suited to the viewer’s time, more integrated with advertising, more personal, more portable and will feature more on-screen talent.”

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